Motivate Gifted Students to Get Creative With Science

When Google launched its science fair for students ages 13–18 last year, a Google representative stated that science fairs "help students to explore their vision and curiosity through science." But science fairs have come a long way since the days of baking soda volcanoes, as evidenced by 2011 winner Shree Bose's project focusing on what leads some cancer cells to develop a resistance to treatment drugs. (She discusses her project in detail here.)

The contest is divided into age groups: 13–14, 15–16, and 17–18. Last year, after a gender-blind evaluation of more than 10,000 entries, three girls were declared the winners of their respective age groups, a result met with much excitement given that science has long been a male-dominated field. In the video below, the three winners give a TED Talk discussing their experiences and work at length.

This year's contest promises to uncover three more talented young scientists; the deadline is April 1. The panel of judges will be looking at contestants' ideas, presentation skills, and adherence to the scientific method. Also, this year, one entrant will be recognized for making a practical contribution to a social, environmental, or health issue. 

Google is offering a lot of enticing prizes to budding scientists, including a National Geographic trip to the Galapagos Islands, scholarships, and the opportunity to gain real-life work experience in world-renowned science centers such as CERN in Switzerland.

Encourage the young scientists you know to get involved before April 1!