Share the Magic of Alice’s Adventures In Wonderland With Gifted and Talented Students

“What is the use of a book, without pictures or conversations?”

 —Alice, from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

 

An important date related to the famous Alice in Wonderland books is quickly approaching: July 4, 2012 will be the 150th anniversary of the first telling of the story to Alice Liddell, the real-life inspiration for the author Lewis Carroll. What better time, then, to revisit the classic and hugely popular book that has captured both children's and adults’ imaginations for decades and shows no sign of slowing down? Parents and educators can share in the enthusiasm by reading the books aloud, acting them out, watching the films, or creating their own versions in the form of poetry, prose, or play.

By sharing the history behind the book you can also generate excitement in students; Carroll spent more than two years writing and illustrating the book we know today, and on November 26, 1864 he gave it to Alice Liddell as a present. Since then, Alice, Carroll, and the town of Llandudno in Wales (where Alice and her family spent summer vacations) have become celebrities.

Many attractions in Llandudno are set to open to the public sometime during 2013—2014, such as a “Rabbit Hole” and an “Alice Trail” which will serve as a walking tour to highlight the connections of Alice with the town. Of course, if you can’t make the trip, you can easily bring the town and story to your classroom by visiting http://www.wonderland.co.uk/.

On this website you will find “Wonderland News” and the full Alice books including Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, Alice’s Adventures Underground, and Through the Looking-Glass.

If you want to learn more about Alice’s connection to Llandudno, click here.

Or for more history about the book, click here.

Whether you are an educator, a parent, or a student, taking a journey with Alice is guaranteed to bring fantastical fun and ignite conversations in the classroom and at home.