Twitter for Gifted Education Support and Information

by Joel McIntosh

Increasingly, teachers and parents of gifted children use the free service, Twitter, to stay connected and keep informed.

What is Twitter?

Think of Twitter as a microblog. A post on Twitter, called a "tweet," is limited to 140 characters. Each of the following would qualify as tweets on Twitter:
  • Thursday, the school board will consider increasing funding for gifted programs. Please, everyone, come to the meeting and show support.
  • Anyone know of a great unit for gifted students on the topic of how the stock market works?
  • Help! Thursday night is "Math Camp" at the school. Anyone have some fun math activities that students and parents would like?
A tweet on Twitter is much like a publicly available text message from your cell phone (in fact, while Twitter is an online service, you can receive and send tweets to and from your cell phone).

 

Gifted Education Supporters on Twitter

As other social networking sites become cluttered with extraneous gimmicks and advertising, Twitter remains a nice, simple tool for networking with others who share a similar interest. On Twitter, you will find tweets from other teachers of the gifted, gifted and talented state associations, gifted parenting groups, and more ... all sharing ideas and information.

In the last two days, I've read Twitter posts about gifted education teaching positions that are opening at a new school for the gifted, about an important Ohio Senate committee hearing on gifted education scheduled for next week, and about tips for encouraging parent involvement in a gifted classroom. All of that was available on Twitter.

Get Involved With Twitter

For the service to reach its full potential as a communication tool for gifted education supporters, it needs you to join in the discussion. Like any social networking site, Twitter thrives on participation from its members, so join the service, encourage other gifted education supporters to join, and start tweeting!

Twitter lets you limit the tweets you see and read to just the few people you want to "follow," so you need a way to find people with interests like yours. Let me give you one "secret" tip for finding those people. Go to the bottom of your Twitter page, and choose "Search." This directs you to Twitter's advanced search where you can search for topics or issues about which people are posting (the search link at the top of the page only lets you search by user name). This advanced search tool is an easy way to find others who are posting on topics important to you.

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This post originally appeared in Prufrock's Gifted Education blog on April 10, 2009.